Recent

Our Constitution

A Republic Versus A Democracy, Why?

June 13, 2024 1

A Republic Versus A Democracy… The Details: My bet is that virtually all of you have been taught that the U.S. is a democracy. That is wrong. The U.S. is a republic. And the difference is extremely important. The Constitution only refers to a form of government in one place. Article 4, Section 4, states, “The United States shall guarantee to each State in this Union a Republican Form of Government.” What is the difference between a republic and a democracy? When I was in school, I was taught that the use of representatives made us a representative democracy or republic, as opposed to a direct democracy. That is certainly in line with current dictionaries. […]

Civics

Only In America: Dr. Huyler’s Introduction

June 6, 2024 2

Welcome Dr. Huyler and the “Only in America” Series! Dr. Jerome Huyler joins The Founding Project website to bring our members his publication, Only In America. Huyler’s work is a study of America and also on civics education in America and will be presented on The Founding Project website in a series of articles.  In particular, Dr. Huyler responds to one author’s book, which has come to influence a version of civics education that does not coordinate or coincide with the full civics education programs once prevalent in our schools. In Dr. Huyler’s introduction, he begins to contrast the message of this one book and its conflict with prior decades of teaching.  And, in his […]

Economics

Government’s Debt Ceiling, Defined

April 25, 2024 0

What is the Debt Ceiling Limit? The debt ceiling is a limit imposed by Congress on how much debt the federal government can carry at any given time. When the debt ceiling is reached, the US Treasury cannot issue anymore treasury bills, bonds or notes. It can only pay bills as it receives tax revenues. In other words, each time the debt ceiling is increased, it essentially allows the federal government to pay bills above its means. Average Citizen Comparison We can compare this practice to a personal credit card issued by a bank in your name. At issue, you were given a credit limit of $3,000.00 with an interest rate of 21% per year. […]

Our Founders

Abigail, The First Feminist

April 14, 2024 0

Abigail Adams – First Lady and First Feminist Abigail was born Abigail Smith in Weymouth, Ma on Nov. 11, 1744 to Elizabeth Quincy Smith and William Smith. Young Abigail Smith was romantic, energetic and intelligent, at the same time shy and very determined, a mix that seemed to always lead to her being in trouble and causing mischief. Young Abigail She was educated at home, only young men were given formal training but, she overcame this minor setback by the use of her maternal grandfather’s extensive library.  Miss Smith excelled in academics with a preference for math, philosophy, and government. With no formal education, she was very self-conscious about her inability to spell and punctuate […]

Recent

Our Constitution

What Are Unalienable Rights

April 4, 2024 0

Exploring the Source of Our Rights…and Why No Entity Can Take Them From You Thomas Jefferson was very clear as to the source of our rights and why that was important.  No matter what you may have heard about Thomas Jefferson –  I know when I was in high school, it was we were taught that Jefferson was an atheist – he spent a good portion of his life crediting God for our country and promoting that idea that our rights are the gift of God. In Rights of British America (1774), Jefferson wrote, “The God who gave us life gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot […]

No Picture

Shays Rebellion and the Constitution

April 3, 2024 0

Shays Rebellion was an uprising in Massachusetts that took place in 1787. It was in response to dire economic conditions after the Revolutionary War and Government indifference to the plight of rural Massachusettsans.  Shays Rebellion highlighted deficiencies of the weak central government under the Articles of Confederation. As a result, many historians consider it a catalyst to the adoption of our current Constitution.  Economic Problems  In 1780, Daniel Shays retired from service in the Revolutionary War after he became injured. The Fledging United States of America operated at that time under the Articles of Confederation. This first effort to organize a Government in the new World gave almost no power to the Central Government. Although […]

Our Founders

The Revolutionary Love Story: The Adams Family

February 14, 2024 0

Love, Freedom and a Revolution: The Story of John and Abigail Once upon a time, a boy met a girl.  Their love story unfolded amidst the backdrop of a revolution and the founding of a new nation… They met when Abigail was only 15 years old and John was a young man (reports vary as to whether he was 23 or 24) and neither was at all impressed with the other.  Abigail was a lithe girl, when society only found women of more weight to be attractive, and John was noted to be a bit round in the middle and already showed the promise of baldness.  John noted in a diary that he didn’t particularly […]

Our Constitution

America’s First Congress

September 9, 2023 0

America’s First Congress The First Congress and Congress, as we now know it, officially began on March 4, 1789. It came into being due to America’s new Constitution, which was written in 1787.  The new Constitution of the United States of America was written in 1787.  It was ratified in 1788, when the 9th state (New Hampshire) ratified it on June 21, 1788.  It officially began operation in 1789 and is the world’s longest surviving written charter of government. Charting a Course The First Congress’ necessary tasks were many and the new form of government meant the Congress was charting a new course of freedom.  There were no examples for this Congress to follow, because […]

Join

Become a member and be the first to receive TFP news.



We take your privacy seriously, and will not share your information with any third party.

Quote of the Week

In a general sense, all contributions imposed by the government upon individuals for the service of the state, are called taxes, by whatever name they may be known, whether by the name of tribute, tythe, tallage, impost, duty, gabel, custom, subsidy, aid, supply, excise, or other name.
– Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833
I am not influenced by the expectation of promotion or pecuniary reward. I wish to be useful, and every kind of service necessary for the public good, become honorable by being necessary.
– Nathan Hale, remark to Captain William Hull, who had attempted to dissuade him from volunteering for a spy mission for General Washington, September, 1776

Needed From You

The Music

If you loved the website launch song, here is how you can get the music:

(A portion of the proceeds go to The Founding Project.)

This source offered as a courtesy to our members and links to a third party for purchase.

Meme of the Week

Volunteers

The Founding Project is staffed by volunteers from across the United States.

Coming to us from varied backgrounds, our staff is always eager to be joined by others interested in our cause.

If you, like we, also believe that civics education and other concepts essential to liberty needs to be a priority in our lives, please consider volunteering to help The Founding Project.

Everyday citizens help us to promote our cause and our website on social media and anyone with a computer or a media-friendly phone can assist with this measure.

We are also always looking for experienced writers to provide articles to help explain the Constitution, Civics, The Founding Principles and related for our website. Any level of commitment is appreciated.

If you are interested, please contact The Founding Project or on our Facebook page via Messenger.

Thank you for your consideration.

The Founding Project is a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit, tax-exempt charity.

Special Thanks

The Founding Project could not possibly exist without the valuable volunteer efforts of our media team and our communications team.

A patriotic tip of the hat to those of you, who dedicate your efforts to our cause, especially to our talented writers, contributors, and to our graphic artist, Dan Neiferd, for your greatly appreciated commitment to The Founding Project.

Follow on Facebook

History

The Edenton Tea Rebellion

August 13, 2023 0

The Edenton Tea Rebellion boldly railed against the King of England and made all of the Western world gasp.  But, too few know about this courageous act or its impact.   The Boston Tea Party is far more reported, but it wasn’t the only act of brazen pushback against the King of England.  The Edenton Tea Rebellion had significant impact in America and England.  Historically, it also marked the first political activism undertaken by American women.  It demonstrated the power women had, even in the 1770’s, and was a courageous act of treason against the Crown. How It Began The American Revolution came about after years of heavy-handed pressure from the King of England.  America’s…

History

Sergeant Major Fleetwood, Civil War Hero

July 21, 2023 0

The battlefield recount of Christian Fleetwood and his heroic actions which led to his Medal of Honor. For perspective, history notes 180,000 black men fought for their freedom in the Civil War.  Of those 180,000, roughly 40,000 gave their lives.  And, among them, there were 25 who received the Medal of Honor. Twenty-five Black Men Received the Medal of Honor During the Civil War, Fleetwood is One of Those 25 Christian Abraham Fleetwood is one of those men and this is his story… Christian Abraham Fleetwood  was born July 21, 1840 in Baltimore, Maryland, to Charles and Anna Marie Fleetwood, both free persons of color.  He received an excellent early education thanks to the efforts of a…

History

The Mayflower Compact

June 17, 2023 0

The Mayflower Compact, the first governing document of Plymouth Colony Following several brutal months at sea, the area now known as Cape Cod was finally seen on the horizon by those aboard the ship, the Mayflower, which embarked on September 16, 1620. Most, who arrived on Plymouth Rock, were sick from intense sea sickness or other illnesses.  Their original destination was intended to be Northern Virginia and the Hudson River, which is New York, today.  After months of battling storms, high winds and horrible waves, the 102 people on board didn’t care they had missed their destination by many miles. “True Pilgrims” The voyagers included “True Pilgrims” (religious separatists fleeing religious persecution by the Church…