Civics

Only In America: Dr. Huyler’s Introduction

August 6, 2018 Guest Writer 0

Welcome Dr. Huyler and the “Only in America” Series! Dr. Jerome Huyler joins The Founding Project website to bring our members his publication, Only In America. Huyler’s work is a study of America and also on civics education in America and will be presented on The Founding Project website in a series of articles.  In particular, Dr. Huyler responds to one author’s book, which has come to influence a version of civics education that does not coordinate or coincide with the full civics education programs once prevalent in our schools. In Dr. Huyler’s introduction, he begins to contrast the message of this one book and its conflict with prior decades of teaching.  And, in his […]

Our Founders

Founding Mama: Betsy Ross

July 11, 2018 Joe Chiang 0

Betsy Ross…In Her Words A glimpse into the life of Betsy Ross, using her words as she may have spoken them, to tell her story… I am Betsy Ross. Over the last several hundred years, it seems you may have forgotten what happened in the making of our nation’s flag so long ago.  Here is my story and that of our flag… I was born Elizabeth Griscom on January 1, 1752.  My father was Samual Grisom, a carpenter, like Jesus’ dad, Joseph, and my mom was Rebecca James Grisom.  I had 17 brothers and sisters.  We went to a Quaker school nearby.  The Quakers are called “Friends”.  When I became old enough, I learned to […]

Our Founders

Button, The Most Valuable Signature

April 5, 2018 thefpAdmin 0

Button and the His Record-Breaking Signature Button Gwinnett – April circa 1735 to May 19, 1777 – Politics, rivalry and a duel Button was one of three Georgia signers of the Declaration of Independence. He served in Georgia’s colonial legislature in the Second Continental Congress and as president of the Revolutionary Council of Safety.  His life, though short, followed a varied path than ultimately led to politics. From The Beginning Gwinnett was born in Down Hatherly, England in 1735.  He married Ann Bourne in 1757 and the couple had three daughters.  The couple moved from England to America in 1762. Prior to his involvement in government service, Button was an unsuccessful merchant. His retail attempts […]

History

The 1st Regiment of Rhode Island

February 18, 2018 Peter Crowell Anderson 0

1st Regiment of Rhode Island and The Role of Slaves in the American Revolution The story of the 1st regiment of Rhode Island and of the role of slaves in the Revolutionary War is not one commonly told, but should be.  In January 1778, General Washington had given his approval for Rhode Island’s plan to raise an entire regiment of black soldiers. Over the next five years, 250 former slave and freedmen served in the 1st Rhode Island Regiment. The 1st Rhode Island Infantry Regiment The 1st Rhode Island Regiment was a Continental Army regiment from Rhode Island during the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783). Like most regiments of the Continental Army, the unit went through several incarnations and name changes. It became well known as the “Black […]

Our Founders

Revolutionary Woman of Mystery: Who is Molly Pitcher

February 6, 2018 Maggie Dine 0

Founding Momma: Molly Pitcher Who is Molly Pitcher?  The stories of countless women, who made heroic and significant efforts to found America, do not end with their support of their husbands and hard work to maintain family farms, businesses and homes.  Nor do they end with the sacrifice of loved ones, life savings and homes or their long hours of making ammo and tending to the injured.  The founding mothers took their fight for freedom to every aspect needed by their families and country. Case in point:  Molly Pitcher, the name that has become the face of the role of women at the battlefront of the Revolutionary War. Many believe that Molly Pitcher is actually […]

Our Founders

The Revolutionary Love Story: The Adams Family

February 2, 2018 Maggie Dine 0

Love, Freedom and a Revolution: The Story of John and Abigail Once upon a time, a boy met a girl.  Their love story unfolded amidst the backdrop of a revolution and the founding of a new nation… They met when Abigail was only 15 years old and John was a young man (reports vary as to whether he was 23 or 24) and neither was at all impressed with the other.  Abigail was a lithe girl, when society only found women of more weight to be attractive, and John was noted to be a bit round in the middle and already showed the promise of baldness.  John noted in a diary that he didn’t particularly […]

Our Country

A Priest, A Rabbi and Two Ministers…

January 28, 2018 Maggie Dine 0

Remembering The Four Chaplains Remembering the Four Chaplains:  The U.S. Army transfer ship, the Dorchester, was loaded with 751 new soldiers, mostly teens and young adults, heading off to serve in World War II.  It was February 2, 1943 when they boarded and were joined by the crew,  some civilian workers and four chaplains, the onboard count was 900 people, crammed tightly onto the ship.  The ship sailed from Boston Harbor with a destination of Greenland. The seas were rough and most spent their time feeling sick as they tried to sleep below deck. On February 3rd, a German submarine targeted the heavily laden ship and three torpedoes struck it, immediately killing many and sending […]

History

A Warrior’s Final Call: To Those Who Served

January 25, 2018 Guest Writer 0

A Tribute to Those Who Served To Those Who Served: “My poem, “A Warrior’s Final Call”, is my tribute, to those who have served this nation from its spark of inception known as the Revolutionary War to those today, at this moment, who are serving, whether in their own backyards, or far from home in some foreign land. This is my way of honoring my deep family military heritage, but also the line of all families whose blood runs not only red, but also white and blue. A Heritage of Those Who Served From my many-greats grandfather, who was a veteran of the Revolutionary War, to my ancestor, General John A Logan of the Union […]

Our Founders

Bradford: The First Constitution of the New World

November 21, 2017 Clay Blanche 0

Bradford, Plymouth and The Mayflower Compact Preface:  William Bradford, the governor of Plymouth colony, and his famous and moving diary, a History of Plymouth Plantation, one of the great works of New England literature, will be drawn on heavily in this article. Bradford, The Pilgrims of Plymouth and the First Constitutional Government in the New World Bradford was not only a gifted writer, he would also become one of the heroic pioneers of Western history, laying the cornerstones that made possible the building of the American Republic. On August 5, 1620, the Pilgrims set sail, encountering, according to Bradford, “many fierce storms in which the ship was soundly shaken.” Amazingly, only two died on the […]

Our Founders

Prince Hall: Founder and Renowned Black Leader

November 15, 2017 Peter Crowell Anderson 0

Prince Hall: Building Blocks of Freedom for Slaves Known as a crucial black leader of his time, Prince Hall was one of the original Patriots of the American Revolution in Boston. Both he and his sons fought with George Washington as part of The Continental Army. He also founded the first Black American Organization and Institution  in 1775, the first black mason organization. His best known quote: “My brethren, let us pay all due respect to all who God had put in places of honor over us: do justly and be faithful to them that hire you, and treat them with the respect they may deserve; but worship no man. Worship God, this much is your duty […]

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