History

Awuah: From Microsoft Millionaire to Educator

May 12, 2021 Peter Crowell Anderson 0

Awuah: From Microsoft to Ghana With so many Americans working from home now and especially so during the 2020 health emergency, we should thank one of the people, who was instrumental in making Internet Communications possible, Patrick Awuah, Jr. The Story of Patrick Awuah, Jr. Patrick Awuah, Jr. can be considered one of the Pioneers of Internet Communications.  He was one of the original Microsoft Team Members in 1988 who developed the first Dial Up Applications.  He left all of that and his life as an American multi-millionaire before the age of 30 and returned to his home in Ghana to found Ashesi University in Accra, Ghana.  Here are his words and here is his […]

History

The Incomparable Josephine Baker

Josephine Baker: War Hero, Stage and Screen Star and Mother In honor of both Mother’s Day and the 76th Anniversary of The End of World War Two in Europe, here is the remarkable story of Josephine Baker, a war hero and mother to 12 (yes, twelve) adopted children… The Overview: American-born Josephine Baker became a famous Broadway singer and dancer in the U.S. in the 1920’s. She would eventually end up moving to France to become a movie star in 1925. In 1937, she opened her own night club the Chez Josephine, in Paris. After the fall of France to the Germans in 1940, Ms. Baker became a member of the French Resistance Movement. Her […]

The Founding Principles

Justice: The Absence of Injustice

May 2, 2021 Lynda Bryant Work 0

Building a Great Nation, Part 5 Justice: The Absence of Injustice  Having suffered the many injustices of the British government, the Founders were intent on establishing a system of justice, order and defense within the legitimate function of the political realm a limited and delegated authority. Because they believed a person’s unalienable rights such as life, liberty, property, personal pursuit of goals and happiness are gifts from God’s natural law, the role of government they believed would be to secure those unalienable rights. They saw laws as protecting the citizen from criminals and the Constitution protecting the citizen from the government. The Founders saw justice as the absence of injustice achieved by securing individual rights. Justice […]

History

Shays Rebellion and Our Constitution

April 23, 2021 Shannon D. Hanson 0

Shays’ Rebellion, Impact That Led to Our Constitution Shays Rebellion was an uprising in Massachusetts that took place in 1787. It was in response to dire economic conditions after the Revolutionary War and Government indifference to the plight of rural Massachusettsans.  Shays Rebellion highlighted deficiencies of the weak central government under the Articles of Confederation. As a result, many historians consider it a catalyst to the adoption of our current Constitution.  Economic Hardship  In 1780, Daniel Shays retired from service in the Revolutionary War after he became injured. The Fledging United States of America operated at that time under the Articles of Confederation. This first effort to organize a Government in the new World gave […]

History

Who are “The Black Patriots”?

February 8, 2021 Peter Crowell Anderson 0

The Black Patriots of The American Revolution Who exactly are “The Black Patriots” of America?  Get to know the crucial thousands, who played a critical role in the American Revolutionary War… By Definition… Whenever we celebrate our nation’s birthday, let us remember all the men and women who made this nation possible.  Included in those remembered are at least 5,000 Black Men, who made a huge gamble and supported the Revolutionary Cause by fighting in the Continental Army.  History records the name, Black Patriot, was used for all African Americans who sided with the colonists in opposing the British.  The term, Black Patriot, refers to, but is not limited to, the 5,000 or more African […]

History

The Declaration of Independence, Exact Transcript

October 12, 2020 thefpAdmin 0

Declaration of Independence: A Transcription Editor’s Note: This is a transcription of the Engraving of the parchment of The Declaration of Independence, a document on display in the National Archives Museum Rotunda.  The spelling,  punctuations and wording is exact to the original document. The signers of this Declaration are included at the bottom, along with the state they represented. In Congress, July 4, 1776 The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the […]

Our Founders

Richard Henry Lee and Independence

October 5, 2020 Margo Louis 1

Richard Henry Lee and America’s Steps to Independence Richard Henry Lee was a prominent statesman from Virginia.  Though not a firebrand, like Patrick Henry, or quite as prolific as Thomas Paine, Lee became known as a powerful orator and writer.  His words, spoken and in print, were important cogs in the wheels that churned toward America’s independence from England. Lee was born in Virginia and following home tutoring and then schooling in England, he returned to America and served as a Justice of the Peace for Westmoreland County.  In 1758, he was elected to the Virginia House of Burgesses and was later a delegate to Continental Congress. The Steps Toward Independence Following the Seven Years […]

Alice Augusta Ball, Unsung American Chemist

September 25, 2020 Peter Crowell Anderson 0

Alice Augusta Ball: The Woman Who Cured Leprosy So few know the name, Alice Augusta Ball or her accomplishments, because initially another man took credit for her work. But Alice Augusta Ball is a black woman and is now known for significantly contributing to medical discoveries and firsts for women.  This is her story… Leprosy or Hansen’s Disease One of the most virulent plagues known to mankind is Leprosy, also called Hansen’s Disease.   Because the disease was highly contagious, painful and disfiguring, and known to cause certain death, patients with Leprosy were immediately forced into quarantine far from others.   Patients experienced slow, miserable deaths due to this disease with little to comfort them. […]

History

Articles of Confederation, Part 2: Confederacy Lessons Learned

September 1, 2020 Shannon D. Hanson 0

The Articles of Confederation, Part 2 The Articles of Confederation formed the first government of America, but it did not last long.  The idea of a weak central government and strong state governments appealed to colonists who had come to fear any type of strong central government. Their prior experiences with England warranted this.  A confederacy appealed to the colonists, because of that fear.  In Shannon D. Hanson’s first article about the Articles of Confederation, he explained the basics about that document.  His follow-up article explains the difficulties that came with having a central government that was too weak.  Links to Hanson’s first article about the Articles of Confederation and also the full text of […]

Our Country

Opportunity and Absence of Coercion

August 17, 2020 Lynda Bryant Work 0

Building a Great Nation, Part 4 Freedom: Opportunity and Absence of Coercion Freedom is the opportunity to apply free will in personal goals and religious worship.  Freedom allows the ability to try, but it no way offers a guarantee of success. And for those who do not succeed or try in a free society, the government is not authorized to redistribute the wealth which comes from the labors of others. The Founders left that individual charity, families and churches be at the local levels. From the earliest colonial days, local governments took responsibility for their poor. However, able-bodied men and women generally were not supported by the taxpayers unless they worked.  Opportunity and Help for Those […]

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