Education

The U. S. Constitution: Simplified

July 24, 2018 thefpAdmin 0

The U. S. Constitution: Simplied…Abbreviated for beginning understanding or quick reference When you just want to get the general or simplified idea of what is covered, TFP offers an abbreviated version of the U.S. Constitution.  Think of this as your “pocket version” of the full Constitution.  It is not meant to be a version for legal purposes or study.  It is meant to give our members the general idea of each portion of the Constitution for better understanding or a beginning approach to learning about the greatest document of freedom the world had experienced.   Look for general definitions at the end of this simplified version.  The full, original transcription of the U. S. Constitution […]

Our Founders

The Mamas, The Papas and Our Founding

May 4, 2018 thefpAdmin 0

We cannot forget the mamas… The term, “Founders”, has long been in use, however the term, “Founding Fathers” wasn’t used until 1916.  Warren Harding first used the term in his RNC Convention address in 1916 and again in his inaugural speech in 1921. However, no one should let that latter term distract from the real work of freedom, which was fought for by America’s Founding FAMILIES…papas, mamas and sometimes also their children. While much focus has gone to George, Thomas, Ben, and their cohorts, it cannot be forgotten that America’s Founding Families faced incredible challenges and sacrifices in the name of freedom. A Different Life Unlike today’s politicians, the colonial era leaders all had thriving […]

Our Founders

Button, The Most Valuable Signature

April 5, 2018 thefpAdmin 0

Button and the His Record-Breaking Signature Button Gwinnett – April circa 1735 to May 19, 1777 – Politics, rivalry and a duel Button was one of three Georgia signers of the Declaration of Independence. He served in Georgia’s colonial legislature in the Second Continental Congress and as president of the Revolutionary Council of Safety.  His life, though short, followed a varied path than ultimately led to politics. From The Beginning Gwinnett was born in Down Hatherly, England in 1735.  He married Ann Bourne in 1757 and the couple had three daughters.  The couple moved from England to America in 1762. Prior to his involvement in government service, Button was an unsuccessful merchant. His retail attempts […]

Our Constitution

Ratification: The U.S. Constitution’s Fight for Survival

September 18, 2017 thefpAdmin 0

Ratification:  The Need The path to ratification of the U. S. Constitution was paved with lessons learned, obstacles and debate. America was floundering.  They had won the war to be free of the oppression of a king, but were losing the battle to organize a thriving nation. Strongly opposed to any type of strong central government, the Founders organized America as a confederacy.  The Articles of Confederation were adopted on November 15, 1777 and its ratification was completed on March 1, 1781. The idea of a weak central government and strong State governments appealed to every American citizen, who bravely fought for America’s freedom from the King of England. But, following the ratification, reality was […]

The Founding Principles

The Six Basic Constitution Principles

August 25, 2017 thefpAdmin 0

The Key Principles Powering Our Freedom The U.S. Constitution was constructed with Six (6) Basic Principles in Mind.   It is these basic guides that kept the authors of the Constitution on track and guided the content of the world’s greatest document of real freedom. Popular Sovereignty: Popular Sovereignty means “peoples’ rule” or that only the people empower the state or nation. “We the People”–the words at the beginning of The Constitution of the United States of America introduces popular sovereignty in the Constitution’s Preamble or introduction. The government of the United States was established by The People and the U. S. government derives its power solely from The People, the citizens of the United […]

Our Constitution

The Originally Proposed Bill of Rights

August 21, 2017 thefpAdmin 0

Bill of Rights: The Original Proposed Transcript and the Original Final Ratified Document The transcription included here is the recorded original of the Joint Resolution of Congress PROPOSING the Bill of Rights.  These proposed amendments and the final accepted and ratified Bill of Rights document is on permanent display in the Rotunda at the National Archives Museum. The punctuation and spelling for both is the same as the original documents. History: On September 25, 1789, the First Congress of the United States proposed 12 amendments to the Constitution. The 1789 Joint Resolution of Congress proposed the amendments now on display in the Rotunda in the National Archives Museum. Ten of the proposed 12 amendments were […]

Our Constitution

The PreAmble: Bill of Rights

August 17, 2017 thefpAdmin 0

The PreAmble to the Bill of Rights The Bill of Rights was a specifically negotiated and planned addition to the U. S. Constitution as an assurance to guard against the federal government from becoming too powerful and to protect Individual Rights and there is importance to its PreAmble. The focus of the Bill of Rights is usually made upon the ten Amendments to the U. S. Constitution, which comprise the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights are the only amendments to the Constitution planned with a PreAmble and presented and ratified as a group of ten amendments. This PreAmble notes the purpose of the Bill of Rights and refers to the Fifth Article of […]

Our Constitution

Our First “Constitution”: The Articles of Confederation

August 17, 2017 thefpAdmin 4

Why the Articles of Confederation failed its New Nation The Articles of Confederation was the first constitution of the United States of America. It established a confederate style of government for America, which united 13 States with their own strong governments under one purposefully weak central government. A Confederacy was born The Founders established a confederacy, because they had just fought a war (the Revolutionary War) against the British to escape an oppressively strong central government. The Founders wanted to avoid any type of strong central government. They opted to give the States the power to establish their own governments, foreign relations, trade agreements, military and economic practices. This distribution of power was chosen by […]

History

The Poems of The Tenth Muse ~ America’s Poet

July 30, 2017 TFP Staff 0

Sampling the Poems of America’s First Female Poet Anne Bradstreet is considered to be America’s First Female Poet and among the first American Poets of record.   Her works were largely kept hidden, given the nature of Puritan life at that time (See TFP website article, The Tenth Muse, by Jonathan Henderson.) and were initially panned by critics, who did not understand the Puritan ways or her style. Her brother-in-law took her earlier writings to England for publication as The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America, perhaps unknown to her, where they were published in 1650 and met with much  approval.  In 1658, her book was listed in the list of Most Vendible Books in […]

Media

Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary

May 30, 2017 TFP Staff 0

Gary Sinise Foundation ~ Marking Pearl Harbor’s 75th Anniversary Looking Back In the early hours of December 7th, 1941, Japanese fighter planes attacked the U. S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.  In just two hours, more than 2000 American soldiers, sailors and civilians died and another 1000 were wounded and 20 American naval vessels and more than 300 airplanes.  Following the assault, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Congress to declare war on Japan and, more than two years into the conflict, America had finally entered World War II. What followed that early morning attack on Pearl Harbor has gone down in history as a valiant fight by our military heroes stationed at Pearl […]

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