History

Shays Rebellion and Our Constitution

April 23, 2021 Shannon D. Hanson 0

Shays’ Rebellion, Impact That Led to Our Constitution Shays Rebellion was an uprising in Massachusetts that took place in 1787. It was in response to dire economic conditions after the Revolutionary War and Government indifference to the plight of rural Massachusettsans.  Shays Rebellion highlighted deficiencies of the weak central government under the Articles of Confederation. As a result, many historians consider it a catalyst to the adoption of our current Constitution.  Economic Hardship  In 1780, Daniel Shays retired from service in the Revolutionary War after he became injured. The Fledging United States of America operated at that time under the Articles of Confederation. This first effort to organize a Government in the new World gave […]

Politics

Campaign Manipulation and Alinsky

April 6, 2021 Margo Louis 1

How Manipulation Became Part of American Campaigns Saul Alinsky is an American author and community organizer often considered to be the father of modern community organizing.  He is often noted for his 1971 book, Rules for Radicals, along with a having a penchant for Satan.   Although, Alinsky is most often linked to recent political figures from the more liberal camps, who studied his works with great intensity, the use of Alinsky-type tactics can be found in numerous campaigns of both the social and activist type. Because the Alinsky method or methodology preys on emotions and a slow and steady manipulation of groups of people, it is important to be able to recognize these tactics […]

Our Government

Polling in the United States: Safe?

February 1, 2021 Maggie Dine 0

Assessing Polling in the United States of America…How Safe is Your Vote? The Constitution of the United States gives the states the power to handle polling (voting) in accordance with the Constitution. But, how does each state handle polling? And, how do Americans determine how safe their vote is and whether some claims about voting are true or not? The United States has some basic compliance laws for polling/voting.   The federal government established an independent commission and programs to assist each state to assure safe polling.  In addition, the United States tasks federal departments with providing cybersecurity and other assistance, guidance and monitoring to further safeguard voting in the United States. But…How does a […]

The Amendments

The 14th Amendment and Rights

December 6, 2020 thefpAdmin 0

Why The 14th Amendment? After the Civil War, the United States needed to swiftly deal with several aspects of citizenship and the rights of citizens. Three amendments were ratified in July of 1868 and were collectively known as the “Reconstruction Amendments”.  The 14th Amendment was intended to protect the rights of formerly enslaved people, but has continued to play a role in constitutional politics. In response to the Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln, the first step to free slaves, and The 13th Amendment, which freed slaves, some Southern states enacted laws known as “Black Codes”.  These “Black Codes” targeted recently freed slaves and restricted their ability to travel widely, own certain types of property and-or […]

Our Founders

Richard Henry Lee and Independence

October 5, 2020 Margo Louis 1

Richard Henry Lee and America’s Steps to Independence Richard Henry Lee was a prominent statesman from Virginia.  Though not a firebrand, like Patrick Henry, or quite as prolific as Thomas Paine, Lee became known as a powerful orator and writer.  His words, spoken and in print, were important cogs in the wheels that churned toward America’s independence from England. Lee was born in Virginia and following home tutoring and then schooling in England, he returned to America and served as a Justice of the Peace for Westmoreland County.  In 1758, he was elected to the Virginia House of Burgesses and was later a delegate to Continental Congress. The Steps Toward Independence Following the Seven Years […]

Civics

Exploring Populism in Politics

September 28, 2020 Margo Louis 0

Defining Populism Defining Populism is challenging, because it is a shallow political theory with a number of variations.   Populism doesn’t belong to any one political party.  And, Populism isn’t necessarily bad. With Populism, it depends on how far it goes, how it is used, and if the public is generally aware of its use.  Because Populism has no specific stances or policies, it is more of a movement that involves inspiring people, because of a leader who inspires supporters. The First Use of the Word, Populist, in the U. S. The word, populist, first appeared in 1890 when a party by that name, The Populist Party, organized to represent the interests of farmers against […]

History

Articles of Confederation, Part 2: Confederacy Lessons Learned

September 1, 2020 Shannon D. Hanson 0

The Articles of Confederation, Part 2 The Articles of Confederation formed the first government of America, but it did not last long.  The idea of a weak central government and strong state governments appealed to colonists who had come to fear any type of strong central government. Their prior experiences with England warranted this.  A confederacy appealed to the colonists, because of that fear.  In Shannon D. Hanson’s first article about the Articles of Confederation, he explained the basics about that document.  His follow-up article explains the difficulties that came with having a central government that was too weak.  Links to Hanson’s first article about the Articles of Confederation and also the full text of […]

Our Country

Opportunity and Absence of Coercion

August 17, 2020 Lynda Bryant Work 0

Building a Great Nation, Part 4 Freedom: Opportunity and Absence of Coercion Freedom is the opportunity to apply free will in personal goals and religious worship.  Freedom allows the ability to try, but it no way offers a guarantee of success. And for those who do not succeed or try in a free society, the government is not authorized to redistribute the wealth which comes from the labors of others. The Founders left that individual charity, families and churches be at the local levels. From the earliest colonial days, local governments took responsibility for their poor. However, able-bodied men and women generally were not supported by the taxpayers unless they worked.  Opportunity and Help for Those […]

The Founding Principles

Introducing The Founding Principles

July 31, 2020 Guest Writer 2

The Founding Principles: An Introduction While The Founding Project does not typically publish editorial pieces, this one seems to be a fitting introduction to a meme series The Founding Project will be rolling out over the coming weeks, which is all about The Founding Principles.  The Founding Principles are the ideals or concepts our Founders believed were the base of freedom and a guide for citizens to maintain the freedom for which they fought to hard to attain. As an introduction to this meme series, The Founding Project introduces a guest writer, who has served our nation and whose son now currently also serves.  Further, our guest writer also works to benefit the Gary Sinise […]

Our Constitution

The Articles of Confederation Complete Text

July 27, 2020 thefpAdmin 0

TO ALL TO WHOM these Presents shall come, we the undersigned Delegates of the States affixed to our Names send greeting. Whereas the Delegates of the United States of America in Congress assembled did on the fifteenth day of November in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy seven, and in the Second Year of the Independence of America agree to certain articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia in the Words following, viz. “Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the states of New […]

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