Our Founders

Bradford: The First Constitution of the New World

November 21, 2017 Clay Blanche 0

Bradford, Plymouth and The Mayflower Compact Preface:  William Bradford, the governor of Plymouth colony, and his famous and moving diary, a History of Plymouth Plantation, one of the great works of New England literature, will be drawn on heavily in this article. Bradford, The Pilgrims of Plymouth and the First Constitutional Government in the New World Bradford was not only a gifted writer, he would also become one of the heroic pioneers of Western history, laying the cornerstones that made possible the building of the American Republic. On August 5, 1620, the Pilgrims set sail, encountering, according to Bradford, “many fierce storms in which the ship was soundly shaken.” Amazingly, only two died on the […]

Politics

Enemies of the Constitution

November 14, 2017 Clay Blanche 0

When Government Threatens Freedom Enemies of the Constitution and Well-Meaning Government Perhaps the craziest idea to be given an airing in published works is Prof. Louis Michael Sideman’s opinion piece, “Let’s Give Up on the Constitution,” a direct hit on the Constitution and an opinion that is one of many enemies of the Constitution. According to his commentary, Prof. Seidman has “taught constitutional law for almost 40 years” and he was “ashamed” it took him that long to conclude that it was an outdated, “bizarre” document. I have not taught classes on the Constitution but, am a constitutional scholar and have written many articles on the Constitution and it’s interpretation, and it should be self-evident […]

Our Founders

Abigail, The First Feminist

August 24, 2017 Clay Blanche 0

Abigail Adams – First Lady and First Feminist Abigail was born Abigail Smith in Weymouth, Ma on Nov. 11, 1744 to Elizabeth Quincy Smith and William Smith. Young Abigail Smith was romantic, energetic and intelligent, at the same time shy and very determined, a mix that seemed to always lead to her being in trouble and causing mischief. Young Abigail She was educated at home, only young men were given formal training but, she overcame this minor setback by the use of her maternal grandfather’s extensive library.  Miss Smith excelled in academics with a preference for math, philosophy, and government. With no formal education, she was very self-conscious about her inability to spell and punctuate […]

Our Constitution

The Powers of the Executive Branch

July 30, 2017 Clay Blanche 0

THE POWERS OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH The executive exercises vital powers in foreign and domestic areas. He is principally responsible for the nation’s foreign policy: He negotiates treaties, receives ambassadors,and serves as commander in chief of the military. The President may appoint officers. He is responsible for executing, or carrying out, the laws of the land, but also has the discretion to pardon. Though the Founders created a unitary executive, the legislature exercises several important checks on the executive, holding the power to declare war, advise and consent to appointments, and ratify treaties. As the only wholly national figure, the President reports to Congress on the State of the Union. The President may convene sessions […]

Our Constitution

The Principles of Constitutional Interpretation

June 19, 2017 Clay Blanche 0

Principles of Constitutional Interpretation People attempt to interpret the principles of the Constitution (constitutional interpretation) and get it wrong because of faulty technique or trying to bend it to their own agenda. Read below and let’s explore a better understanding of the Constitution… I studied Pre-Constitutional Law and Political Science at Texas A&M and most of my information is from my time in pursuit of my degree.  Remember: If the Constitution was simple and easy to understand, we wouldn’t need the Supreme Court! Constitutional interpretation, or constitutional construction, the term more often used by the Founders, is the process by which legal decisions are made that are justified by a constitution, although not necessarily correctly. […]

The Amendments

Due Process and Amendment Fourteen

June 6, 2017 Clay Blanche 0

Amendment Fourteen — Due Process Amendment Fourteen is one of the most used (and, perhaps, misused) parts of the Constitution. Amendment Fourteen came out of the Civil War. Basically, it says that all men 21 or older will be counted to determine representation in Congress, with a reduction in that count for anyone not allowed to vote; that no one in the Confederate government (or any future government of insurrection) may be members of the U.S. government (unless approved by a two-thirds vote); and that all debts incurred by the U.S. to fight the Confederacy are to be paid, but none of those incurred by the Confederacy would be. It also states that no State […]