Our Country

A Priest, A Rabbi and Two Ministers…

January 28, 2018 Maggie Dine 0

Remembering The Four Chaplains Remembering the Four Chaplains:  The U.S. Army transfer ship, the Dorchester, was loaded with 751 new soldiers, mostly teens and young adults, heading off to serve in World War II.  It was February 2, 1943 when they boarded and were joined by the crew,  some civilian workers and four chaplains, the onboard count was 900 people, crammed tightly onto the ship.  The ship sailed from Boston Harbor with a destination of Greenland. The seas were rough and most spent their time feeling sick as they tried to sleep below deck. On February 3rd, a German submarine targeted the heavily laden ship and three torpedoes struck it, immediately killing many and sending […]

History

A Warrior’s Final Call: To Those Who Served

January 25, 2018 Guest Writer 0

A Tribute to Those Who Served To Those Who Served: “My poem, “A Warrior’s Final Call”, is my tribute, to those who have served this nation from its spark of inception known as the Revolutionary War to those today, at this moment, who are serving, whether in their own backyards, or far from home in some foreign land. This is my way of honoring my deep family military heritage, but also the line of all families whose blood runs not only red, but also white and blue. A Heritage of Those Who Served From my many-greats grandfather, who was a veteran of the Revolutionary War, to my ancestor, General John A Logan of the Union […]

Our Founders

Bradford: The First Constitution of the New World

November 21, 2017 Clay Blanche 0

Bradford, Plymouth and The Mayflower Compact Preface:  William Bradford, the governor of Plymouth colony, and his famous and moving diary, a History of Plymouth Plantation, one of the great works of New England literature, will be drawn on heavily in this article. Bradford, The Pilgrims of Plymouth and the First Constitutional Government in the New World Bradford was not only a gifted writer, he would also become one of the heroic pioneers of Western history, laying the cornerstones that made possible the building of the American Republic. On August 5, 1620, the Pilgrims set sail, encountering, according to Bradford, “many fierce storms in which the ship was soundly shaken.” Amazingly, only two died on the […]

Our Founders

Prince Hall: Founder and Renowned Black Leader

November 15, 2017 Peter Crowell Anderson 0

Prince Hall: Building Blocks of Freedom for Slaves Known as a crucial black leader of his time, Prince Hall was one of the original Patriots of the American Revolution in Boston. Both he and his sons fought with George Washington as part of The Continental Army. He also founded the first Black American Organization and Institution  in 1775, the first black mason organization. His best known quote: “My brethren, let us pay all due respect to all who God had put in places of honor over us: do justly and be faithful to them that hire you, and treat them with the respect they may deserve; but worship no man. Worship God, this much is your duty […]

Our Constitution

Ratification: The U.S. Constitution’s Fight for Survival

September 18, 2017 thefpAdmin 0

Ratification:  The Need The path to ratification of the U. S. Constitution was paved with lessons learned, obstacles and debate. America was floundering.  They had won the war to be free of the oppression of a king, but were losing the battle to organize a thriving nation. Strongly opposed to any type of strong central government, the Founders organized America as a confederacy.  The Articles of Confederation were adopted on November 15, 1777 and its ratification was completed on March 1, 1781. The idea of a weak central government and strong State governments appealed to every American citizen, who bravely fought for America’s freedom from the King of England. But, following the ratification, reality was […]

Our Founders

Abigail, The First Feminist

August 24, 2017 Clay Blanche 0

Abigail Adams – First Lady and First Feminist Abigail was born Abigail Smith in Weymouth, Ma on Nov. 11, 1744 to Elizabeth Quincy Smith and William Smith. Young Abigail Smith was romantic, energetic and intelligent, at the same time shy and very determined, a mix that seemed to always lead to her being in trouble and causing mischief. Young Abigail She was educated at home, only young men were given formal training but, she overcame this minor setback by the use of her maternal grandfather’s extensive library.  Miss Smith excelled in academics with a preference for math, philosophy, and government. With no formal education, she was very self-conscious about her inability to spell and punctuate […]

Our Constitution

The Originally Proposed Bill of Rights

August 21, 2017 thefpAdmin 0

Bill of Rights: The Original Proposed Transcript and the Original Final Ratified Document The transcription included here is the recorded original of the Joint Resolution of Congress PROPOSING the Bill of Rights.  These proposed amendments and the final accepted and ratified Bill of Rights document is on permanent display in the Rotunda at the National Archives Museum. The punctuation and spelling for both is the same as the original documents. History: On September 25, 1789, the First Congress of the United States proposed 12 amendments to the Constitution. The 1789 Joint Resolution of Congress proposed the amendments now on display in the Rotunda in the National Archives Museum. Ten of the proposed 12 amendments were […]

Our Constitution

The PreAmble: Bill of Rights

August 17, 2017 thefpAdmin 2

The PreAmble to the Bill of Rights The Bill of Rights was a specifically negotiated and planned addition to the U. S. Constitution as an assurance to guard against the federal government from becoming too powerful and to protect Individual Rights and there is importance to its PreAmble. The focus of the Bill of Rights is usually made upon the ten Amendments to the U. S. Constitution, which comprise the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights are the only amendments to the Constitution planned with a PreAmble and presented and ratified as a group of ten amendments. This PreAmble notes the purpose of the Bill of Rights and refers to the Fifth Article of […]

Our Constitution

Our First “Constitution”: The Articles of Confederation

August 17, 2017 thefpAdmin 4

Why the Articles of Confederation failed its New Nation The Articles of Confederation was the first constitution of the United States of America. It established a confederate style of government for America, which united 13 States with their own strong governments under one purposefully weak central government. A Confederacy was born The Founders established a confederacy, because they had just fought a war (the Revolutionary War) against the British to escape an oppressively strong central government. The Founders wanted to avoid any type of strong central government. They opted to give the States the power to establish their own governments, foreign relations, trade agreements, military and economic practices. This distribution of power was chosen by […]

History

The Poems of The Tenth Muse ~ America’s Poet

July 30, 2017 TFP Staff 0

Sampling the Poems of America’s First Female Poet Anne Bradstreet is considered to be America’s First Female Poet and among the first American Poets of record.   Her works were largely kept hidden, given the nature of Puritan life at that time (See TFP website article, The Tenth Muse, by Jonathan Henderson.) and were initially panned by critics, who did not understand the Puritan ways or her style. Her brother-in-law took her earlier writings to England for publication as The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America, perhaps unknown to her, where they were published in 1650 and met with much  approval.  In 1658, her book was listed in the list of Most Vendible Books in […]

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